Skip to content

Hepatitis B

Understand and care  Coping with Chronic Hepatitis B together

Understand and care    Coping with Chronic Hepatitis B together

People with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) should:
  • Handle open wounds with care and make sure they are properly bandaged
  • Do not share personal care items, such as toothbrush, razor and nail scissors
  • Do not share needle or any other injecting equipment
  • Disinfect items contaminated by blood or body fluids of infected persons: wear gloves and disinfect with household bleach
  • Do not donate blood, sperm or other body organs. If you want to donate your organs after your death, you should write down your organ donation card that you have CHB infection
  • Practice 'Safer Sex', i.e. proper use of latex condom in sexual intercourse
  • If your household members and sexual partners are non-immune and not infected with hepatitis B, they should receive vaccination as soon as possible
  • Seek medical advice and regular monitoring to formulate the plan for investigation and treatment
  • Do not smoke and drink, and do not take medications with uncertain ingredients to avoid liver damage
  • Maintain a healthy lifestyle with balanced diet, adequate sleep and regular exercises. These help increase the body's resistance against diseases
Contact with people with Chronic Hepatitis B (CHB)

Contact with people with Chronic Hepatitis B

You will not get infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) from normal social contacts.

Hepatitis B is not spread through sharing eating utensils, breastfeeding, hugging, kissing, shaking hands, coughing or sneezing.

People who do not know if they have hepatitis B infection are recommended to take a blood test, which includes hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs). People found to be infected with HBV should seek medical consultation, while people found to be non-immune to HBV infection should receive vaccination as soon as possible.